About Pittsburg

Pittsburg is a town in Coos County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 869 at the 2010 census.[1] It is the northernmost town in New Hampshire and the largest town by area in the state – and in New England as well – more than twice the size of the next largest town, Lincoln. U.S. Route 3 is the only major highway in the town, although the northern terminus of New Hampshire Route 145 also lies within Pittsburg.

Pittsburg derives its name from , Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. Prior to its incorporation in 1840, the area was settled ca 1810 and known as the Territory of Indian Stream. It had the unique distinction of having been its own microstate briefly during the 1830s, called the Republic of Indian Stream, due to an ambiguous boundary between the United States and Canada.

Pittsburg is the northernmost New Hampshire municipality. It shares an international border with Québec province, Canadato its west and north, and borders the states of Maine (to the east) and Vermont (a very small portion to the southwest). Directly to the south is Clarksville. Pittsburg is the only New Hampshire municipality to border Canada, the only one that borders both Maine and Vermont, and the only one to share a land border with Vermont. Pittsburg contains the only part of New Hampshire west of the Connecticut River, as that river defines the Vermont state line from Clarksville southward. New Hampshire's only Canadian border crossing is located at the northern end of town at the terminus of U.S. Route 3. The western edge of Pittsburg is defined by Halls Stream, being the "northwesternmost headwaters of the Connecticut River", which defined (ambiguously) the border in the Treaty of Paris of 1783.

Contained within the boundaries of Pittsburg are the Connecticut Lakes, which form the beginning of the Connecticut River. Pittsburg also contains the communities of Happy Corner, Idlewilde, and The Glen. Early maps (e.g. 1854) also show several grants that were incorporated into the eastern edge of Pittsburg, including Carlisle No. 1, Webster/Carlisle No. 2 and Hubbards No. 3, all north of Atkinson and Gilmanton Academy Grant.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 291.2 square miles (754 km2), the largest of any municipality incorporated as a town in New England. 281.4 square miles (729 km2) of it is land and 9.8 square miles (25 km2) of it is water, comprising 3.37% of the town.[2]

The highest point in Pittsburg is the summit of Stub Hill, at 3,627 feet (1,106 m) above sea level. Magalloway Mountain, 3,383 feet (1,031 m) above sea level, is a prominent summit reachable by hiking trail.

Read more from Wikipedia

How did Pittsburg get its name? Read all about it!

Rembering the Old Names

Pittsburg Fire DepartmentBuilding Pittsburg NH's Fire Station

August 2, 1999 Byline: LORNA COLQUHOUN: New Hampshire Union Leader Correspondent

With sirens, fanfare and joy Saturday, this building Pittsburg NH's Fire Station community at the top of New Hampshire celebrated the completion of its new fire station that was 10 years in the dreaming and just one year in the building. More than the center of public safety in the far north, the sprawling station is a testament to what made it possible the brotherhood of firefighters, a volunteer department that sacrificed much of its time and the enduring spirit of a fallen comrade. "None of us including the firemen ever imagined that at this time, a building of this magnitude would have been completed as it is today in just one year," said Selectman Burnham "Bing" Judd. "This never would have happened without the support of many people from far and near. The generosity that has been bestowed upon us is overwhelming." More than 10 years ago, the volunteer fire department recognized both the need for a new station and the necessity of building one with as little tax impact as possible. The more the town grew, the wider spread equipment was. The largest town in the state, with a Main Street that runs 30 miles to the Canadian border, Pittsburg has long been a sportsman's haven, but its residents work hard to earn their livings. So over the past decade, the fire department held fundraisers the annual auction, assorted bake sales, dances and bean suppers accumulating money toward a replacement station for the cramped quarters that was built in 1961. Two years ago, when violence killed Fire Chief Leslie Lord, who was also a state trooper, contributions in his memory poured into the department from all over the country. Lord, state trooper Scott Phillips, Colebrook Judge Vickie Bunnell and newspaper editor Dennis Joos were killed Aug. 19, 1997, in Colebrook, when Colebrook resident Carl Drega went on a shooting spree. He was later killed by police. Bolstered by commitments from firefighters from across the region who said they would lend a hand, Pittsburg began planning for its new building. A year ago Saturday, more than 500 people showed up for A Call to Brotherhood and in just three days, put up the 10,000 square foot building. Since then, the local firefighters gave their nights and weekends to complete it and on Saturday, everyone was invited back to celebrate.

"This is unreal it's amazing," said Micol Greenwood, Raymond's deputy fire chief, who worked on the building last year. "They've done a lot of work since then. This is beautiful." Several hundred people representing 20 New Hampshire towns from as far away as Londonderry and Newmarket came out for the afternoon's event, which began with a parade of apparatus from the old station to the new. The volunteer firefighters and their families led the march home, entering the driveway amid cheers and applause. "There was a sense of everyone coming together last year," said Raymond firefighter Rick Abelli. "It was amazing how well everyone worked together and how people from here came out of their way to thank us. You can't ever replace that feeling and you can't put a price on it." Two aerial ladders formed an arch at the entrance, from which an American flag fluttered in a hot, sporadic breeze. With ceremony and emotion, local officials gave the thanks of the town.

"Today we gather in Pittsburg not in sadness, not in work clothes, not with tools, but in celebration," said Berlin Fire Chief Paul Fortier, who helped coordinate last year's construction effort. "To celebrate not only the physical accomplishment of the fire station, but to celebrate the very spirit that made it possible. That spirit of the common good gives us the strength to overcome the horrors and sadness that come our way and allows us to heal. Many communities needed a new station, but we needed to build one." Pittsburg Fire Chief Sandy Young paid tribute to Lord, who served as chief from January 1997 until his death that August, unveiling a portrait painted by Brenda Kenney. "The portrait will be hung in the meeting room and will honor his years of dedication to the Pittsburg Fire Department," he said, his voice breaking. "We all know he carried the spirit."

Copyright 1999, 2002 Union Leader Corp.

Pittsburg Fire Department

Pittsburg is a town in Coos County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 869 at the 2010 census.[1] It is the northernmost town in New Hampshire and the largest town by area in the state – and in New England as well – more than twice the size of the next largest town, Lincoln. U.S. Route 3 is the only major highway in the town, although the northern terminus of New Hampshire Route 145 also lies within Pittsburg.

Pittsburg derives its name from William Pitt, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. Prior to its incorporation in 1840, the area was settled ca 1810 and known as the Territory of Indian Stream. It had the unique distinction of having been its own microstate briefly during the 1830s, called the Republic of Indian Stream, due to an ambiguous boundary between the United States and Canada.

Pittsburg is the northernmost New Hampshire municipality. It shares an international border with Québec province, Canada to its west and north, and borders the states of Maine (to the east) and Vermont (a very small portion to the southwest). Directly to the south is Clarksville. Pittsburg is the only New Hampshire municipality to border Canada, the only one that borders both Maine and Vermont, and the only one to share a land border with Vermont. Pittsburg contains the only part of New Hampshire west of the Connecticut River, as that river defines the Vermont state line from Clarksville southward. New Hampshire's only Canadian border crossing is located at the northern end of town at the terminus of U.S. Route 3. The western edge of Pittsburg is defined by Halls Stream, being the "northwesternmost headwaters of the Connecticut River", which defined (ambiguously) the border in the Treaty of Paris of 1783.

Contained within the boundaries of Pittsburg are the Connecticut Lakes, which form the beginning of the Connecticut River. Pittsburg also contains the communities of Happy Corner, Idlewilde, and The Glen. Early maps (e.g. 1854) also show several grants that were incorporated into the eastern edge of Pittsburg, including Carlisle No. 1, Webster/Carlisle No. 2 and Hubbards No. 3, all north of Atkinson and Gilmanton Academy Grant.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 291.2 square miles (754 km2), the largest of any municipality incorporated as a town in New England. 281.4 square miles (729 km2) of it is land and 9.8 square miles (25 km2) of it is water, comprising 3.37% of the town.[2]

The highest point in Pittsburg is the summit of Stub Hill, at 3,627 feet (1,106 m) above sea level. Magalloway Mountain, 3,383 feet (1,031 m) above sea level, is a prominent summit reachable by hiking trail.

Read more from Wikipedia

How did Pittsburg get its name? Read all about it!

Rembering the Old Names

The area was first settledRepublic of Indian Stream Map by Europeans under a land grant, not from the King of Great Britain, but from the St. Francis Indian chief, called King Philip by his white neighbors, after the great King Philip who had led many successful raids on New England settlements during the 1670s.

This grant was sold to one land-speculation company, while a second group of Indians from the same tribe made representations to another company of Europeans that their chief had been deposed and that they were empowered to issue a grant to the second company. Following the Revolutionary War, both companies surveyed the territories and issued their own land grants to settlers, which frequently overlapped one another. After the War of 1812, when both companies were in financial straits, they merged and reconciled all land claims.

The establishment of Indian Stream as an independent nation was, essentially, the result of the ambiguous boundary between the United States and Canada as defined in the Treaty of Paris. There were three possible interpretations of where "the northwesternmost head of the Connecticut River" might be. As a result, the area (in and around the three tributaries that fed into the head of the Connecticut River) was not definitively under the jurisdiction of either the United States or Canada.

The relevant text from the Treaty reads:

" ... (westward) along the said highlands which divide those rivers that empty themselves into the river St. Lawrence, from those which fall into the Atlantic Ocean, to the northwesternmost head of the Connecticut River; thence down along the middle of that river to the forty-fifth degree of north latitude; from thence by a line due west on said latitude ... "

The Republic encompassed the northern reaches of what is now the state of New Hampshire, including the four Connecticut Lakes. While the British claimed the southeasternmost branch (the chain of Connecticut Lakes), the U.S. claimed the border as we know it today (i.e., Hall's Stream, to the west, which is, arguably, the "northwesternmost headwater" of the Connecticut). Both sides sent in tax-collectors and debt-collecting sheriffs. The double taxation angered the population, and the Republic was formed to put an end to the issue until such time as the United States and Great Britain could reach a settlement on the boundary line.

The Republic ceased to operate independently in 1835 when the New Hampshire Militia occupied the area, following a vote by the Indian Stream Congress authorizing annexation to the United States. The vote arose from disquiet regarding a prior incident in which a group of "streamers" invaded Canada to free a fellow citizen who had been arrested by a British sheriff and magistrate. The reason for the arrest was an unpaid hardware-store debt, and the offender faced confinement in a Canadian debtors' prison. The invading posse shot up the judge's home where their comrade was being held, and this caused a diplomatic crisis, a so-called 'international incident'. The British ambassador to the United States was appalled at the idea of a war over a matter so trivial as a hardware-store debt and quickly agreed to engage in negotiations to resolve the border disputes that had remained outstanding since the time of the Treaty of Paris (1783).

Britain relinquished its claim in January 1836, and American jurisdiction was acknowledged in May 1836. The area was still described as Indian Stream at the time of the 1840 United States Census taken on June 1, 1840; the local population totalled 315. The area was incorporated as the town of Pittsburg in 1840. The town covers 291.4 square miles (755 km2), of which 282.3 sq mi (731 km2) is land area and 9 sq mi (23 km2) is inland water.

In 1842, the land dispute was definitively resolved by the Webster-Ashburton Treaty, and the land was assigned to New Hampshire. However, the 1845 Lewis Robinson Map of New Hampshire based on the latest authorities, shows the boundary north of the town of Clarksville but just south of modern-day Pittsburg.

Read more from Wikipedia

Experience NH ’s History in Pittsburg

Three covered bridges, historic buildings and legendary sporting lodges remain to experience the rugged and colorful history of Pittsburg .

Historic Markers – Once a Sovereign Nation

Two Historic Markers are visible from Rte 3 dedicated to the formation of the Indian Stream Republic – a sovereign nation. One is in the village center that explains the significance of the Republic. The other is 1 mile north of Pittsburg Village at the corner of Rte 3 and Hill Rd. in front of a former schoolhouse. It dedicates the location where the Republic’s constitution was adopted on July 9, 1832.

From about 1829 to 1836, Pittsburg was home to the Indian Stream Republic because for nearly 60 years residents of this wild northern outpost were caught in a dispute that rendered both land titles and international boundaries uncertain. As squabbling increased among the United States and Canadian governments, NH legislators, and two companies claiming land rights, the settlers decided to take matters into their own hands. In 1832, the residents (about 300) declared themselves the independent Indian Stream Republic , establishing a constitution, a bicameral legislature, courts, laws and a militia.  In 1835 “war broke out” when a leader of the Republic was arrested in Canada , then a pro-Canadian resident was arrested in the Republic, some say in retaliation. These events escalated into several more incidents, until the New Hampshire governor ordered the state militia to occupy the Indian Stream Republic . In January 1838 the British gave up their claim. The following May, the local citizens accepted New Hampshire ’s authority.  It was incorporated as the township of Pittsburg by the New Hampshire legislature in the November 1840 session.

The international boundary line was recognized in 1842 with the signing of the Webster-Ashburton Treaty which was proposed by Daniel Webster, Secretary of State.

Author, Daniel Doan’s, historical account of the IndianLost Nation by Jeffrey Lent Stream Republic was published by the Dartmouth College Press.   A rugged historic fictional account of the Indian Stream Republic and early settling of Pittsburg was offered in “Lost Nation”, a novel by Jeffrey Lent.  

The Pittsburg Historical Society was formed in early 1982 and meets at the Town Hall Historical Museum.

The Historical Society meets on the fourth Wednesday of the month.

6:30 p.m. business meeting followed atOld Town Hall Pittsburg NH Historical Society 7:00 p.m. with presentations from June through September at the Town Hall Museum on Main Street.  All are welcome to attend.

There are monthly programs on a variety of topics of local interest, and you do not need to be a member to attend.

Membership in the Society is only $5.00 a year for individuals and $10 a year for families.

Lifetime Membership is $50.

If you have an interest in history, you will enjoy attending our meetings.

Museum Hours:

Saturday 1-3 pm in July and August

Also open 1-3 pm on Old Home Day and Moose Festival.  If you see the flag flying outside the building the museum is open, please stop in.

A Look at Yesteryear in Pittsburg NH
Excerpts from "Town Clerk and Personal Records 1906-1920 by
Sylvester Lyford"

November 24, 1906 Billy Huggins had a fight with Albion Aldrich, he gave him a licking.
December 29, 1906 Bill Chapple Paid his taxes .41 cents
January 17, 1907 -50 degrees at Farnhams. -55 degrees in Colebrook
February 23, 1907 Sold 5# sugar for .30 cents, 4# salt pork for .40 cents
April 3, 1907 Henry Terrill got drunk on rum at Bessie Heath’s.
April 5, 1907 Whit Terrill sobered up.
April 6, 1907 Henry Terrill sobered up.
April 25, 1907 Started log drive on Indian Stream
May 11, 1907 Sold cow to H. Cross for $40.00
July 30, 1907 Sent by stage, full bottle if gin- $1.25, 10 cents for stage
August 22, 1907 Johnnie, & Jamie Gradie was up to lawn party with E. Washburn and Laura Wheeler, stayed out until 12 o’clock. Lizzie Wheeler was some mad.
October 25, 1907 Jack, the tramp, was killed by some dirty sneak.
January 26, 1910 Saw the comet with the long tail.
July 14, 1910 Dr. WW Kerr run over Pat Gray with his auto. He dragged Gray 72 feet before stopping. Pat had been taking something.
September 3, 1910 James Bacon took Lucy Towle down to the county to serve 60 days for selling liquor.
October 12, 1910 Ned Towle was drunk last night and George Hilliard ran over him with a 4 horse team. Hurt him quite bad.
June 30, 1912 Hard frost killed the potatoes.
December 29, 1912 Bought a deer from Frank Baldwin for $3.00
February 6, 1914 Albert Coats built his fire at 4 am was dead at 5 am.
March 23, 1914 Maggie Browns horse ran away and jumped in the river by Scott Lords.
July 26, 1914 Fred Brown wanted me to go to the town office to let him see the letter his wife wrote to Fred Chapple.
August 4, 1914 Fred Brown killed his wife with a flatiron at Kidderville.
December 15, 1917 Electric lights started today.

Businesses are very important to the town of Pittsburg. Our businesses provide employment for our residents, support town activities, support our school sports and provide hospitality to Pittsburg's many visitors.

We want to include all town businesses on this site. If we missed you, please let us know.

Contact us.

Town of Pittsburg Welcome Center

Town of Pittsburg NH Contacts

Selectman's Office This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Town Clerk This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Pittsburg Police Department This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Pittsburg Tax Assessor

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tax Collector

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Public Works-Water/Sewer This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

DownTownAir

 

Pittsburg is a town in Coos County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 869 at the 2010 census.[1] It is the northernmost town in New Hampshire and the largest town by area in the state – and in New England as well – more than twice the size of the next largest town, Lincoln. U.S. Route 3 is the only major highway in the town, although the northern terminus of New Hampshire Route 145 also lies within Pittsburg.

Pittsburg derives its name from , Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. Prior to its incorporation in 1840, the area was settled ca 1810 and known as the Territory of Indian Stream. It had the unique distinction of having been its own microstate briefly during the 1830s, called the Republic of Indian Stream, due to an ambiguous boundary between the United States and Canada.

Pittsburg is the northernmost New Hampshire municipality. It shares an international border with Québec province, Canadato its west and north, and borders the states of Maine (to the east) and Vermont (a very small portion to the southwest). Directly to the south is Clarksville. Pittsburg is the only New Hampshire municipality to border Canada, the only one that borders both Maine and Vermont, and the only one to share a land border with Vermont. Pittsburg contains the only part of New Hampshire west of the Connecticut River, as that river defines the Vermont state line from Clarksville southward. New Hampshire's only Canadian border crossing is located at the northern end of town at the terminus of U.S. Route 3. The western edge of Pittsburg is defined by Halls Stream, being the "northwesternmost headwaters of the Connecticut River", which defined (ambiguously) the border in the Treaty of Paris of 1783.

Contained within the boundaries of Pittsburg are the Connecticut Lakes, which form the beginning of the Connecticut River. Pittsburg also contains the communities of Happy Corner, Idlewilde, and The Glen. Early maps (e.g. 1854) also show several grants that were incorporated into the eastern edge of Pittsburg, including Carlisle No. 1, Webster/Carlisle No. 2 and Hubbards No. 3, all north of Atkinson and Gilmanton Academy Grant.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 291.2 square miles (754 km2), the largest of any municipality incorporated as a town in New England. 281.4 square miles (729 km2) of it is land and 9.8 square miles (25 km2) of it is water, comprising 3.37% of the town.[2]

The highest point in Pittsburg is the summit of Stub Hill, at 3,627 feet (1,106 m) above sea level. Magalloway Mountain, 3,383 feet (1,031 m) above sea level, is a prominent summit reachable by hiking trail.

Read more from Wikipedia

How did Pittsburg get its name? Read all about it!

Rembering the Old Names